Click here to sign up and receive 10% off your first order!

Inspire your preschooler’s imagination: Fun with Shapes

wooden toy color wheel
(Photo source: www.earlylearningtoys.org/)

This is one of the most amazing color wheel’s you’ll ever get to play with! Not only is it colorful, you can create animals, letters shapes and more with the beautifully shaped curves of the pieces.

The traditional color wheel was geometrically redesigned to resemble an iris with the edges of each of the twelve wedges arched to allow the user to create a variety of designs. Kids can make a number of designs by just moving the shapes.

One Shape, Infinite Possibilities

The Chrysanthos color wheel consists of twelve Trigeod shapes and is designed to evoke imagination and creativity. It’s the shapes that allow the children to stack and connect each piece to create their own vision.

Not only is this a creative toy, it is a great teacher resource for challenging children to think out of the box. Children can play with it on their own or with other toys like cars or animal figures. It truly is multi-functional.

wooden toy color wheel
Some imaginative designs that the kindergarten students have created (Photo source: http://educateinvestinspire.blogspot.ca/)

The importance of the Trigeod in play

Creativity is being able to use different elements and express them in a uniquely comprehensible way based on your own personal experiences. The Trigeod promotes this expression in a natural unhindered fashion through open ended play.

This is a process that many children don’t have the chance to experience but it’s valuable to problem-solving, design and creativity. Children will naturally explore the shapes of the pieces and the many ways that you can connect and build with them.

Because of the Trigeod shapes, children are not only playing but dealing with unique problem solving task and decision making. The limits of the Chrysanthos color wheel are only dependent on what the user can imagine.

This is a great toy for children as young as age 3. Who’s ready to have fun with color and shapes?

(Video source: www.earlylearningtoys.org/)

 
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons